whiskey

Store Pick Review: Calandro’s Supermarket 1792 Full Proof and Knob Creek Single Barrel Rye

Calandro’s Supermarket in Baton Rouge, Louisiana just released a couple of store picks they thought I’d be interested in trying. Who am I to turn down whiskey? Mark Calandro and his son Taylor taste and choose the barrels for their stores. Let’s get to tasting.

First up is 1792 Full Proof. This goes into the barrel at 125 proof. After maturation, the whiskey is proofed down to that same proof. Because that could just mean a couple of proof points, this is basically barrel proof bourbon. The nose is rich with hints of caramel, red fruit and spice. Taste-wise, we’re talking about layer after layer of decadent caramel upfront. Additionally, hints of graham cracker and red fruits develop alongside some baking spice and leather. The finish is long, with lingering notes of barrel char and sweet oak. Calandro’s 1792 Full Proof is big, rich, and worth every penny of its $49.99 cost. 8.5/10

Next up is their Knob Creek Single Barrel Rye, currently one of the first of these releases in Louisiana AND the supermarket chain’s first rye whiskey picks. Knob Creek Single Barrel Rye is bottled at 115 proof. The nose is a touch muted at first, but becomes a bit livelier with a little airtime. Aromas of rye spice, fruit, vanilla, and lightly roasted coffee abound. On the palate, a sweet brown sugar entry develops hints of toasted rye grain, cherries, and wood spice. The finish is long and warming, with hints of sweet vanilla and spicy rye. $39.99 8/10

Great picks from Calandro’s! I am excited to see what they bring into the store next.

Thanks to Calandro’s for the generous samples. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

Advertisements

Review: Booker’s Bourbon Batch 2018-03 “Kentucky Chew”

Booker’s just released their third batch of 2018, aptly titled “Kentucky Chew.” The uncut and unfiltered bourbon from Jim Beam is my favorite of their regular production whiskies.

Kentucky Chew refers to how late Beam Master Distiller Booker Noe tasted his whiskey. It involves drawing a little air by smacking your lips after swirling the whiskey around your mouth. If you’ve ever tasted whiskey with current Master Distiller Fred Noe, you’ve witnessed the Kentucky Chew.

Booker’s Kentucky Chew is aged 6 years, 4 months, and 12 days, and bottled at 126.7 proof. The brand released some additional info about this batch:

This batch is made up of barrels from two production dates aged in seven different locations within four warehouses. The breakdown of the barrel locations is as follows:

  • 29% from warehouse D, floor 4

  • 42% from warehouse D, floor 6

  • 8% from warehouse I, floor 4

  • 8% from warehouse I, floor 7

  • 6% from warehouse J, floor 6

  • 2% from warehouse J, floor 7

  • 5% from warehouse N, floor 5 (7 story warehouse)

The nose carries hints of coffee cake, kettle corn, and maraschino cherries. A blast of brown sugar kicks off this unusually sweet batch of Booker’s. It is joined by vanilla pudding, wood spice, and barrel char. There’s a jolt of fruitiness on the backend. The finish is not as long as recent batches of Booker’s and retains some of the sweetness of the nose and palate.

Generally speaking, every batch of Booker’s is going to be slightly different. This new one takes the largest departure in flavor profile while still remaining truly Booker’s through and through. The sweetness is mainly provided by the typical Booker’s vanilla as well as some welcome fruitiness. I don’t mind changes this “drastic” between batches so long as 1) they are delicious, and 2) the Booker’s DNA remains. As for this batch, it comes with a solid recommendation. 8/10

Bookersbourbon.com

Thanks to Booker’s for the sample. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

Review: Barrell Bourbon Batch 016

IMG_3973.jpg

Since my first sip of Batch 005, I’ve enjoyed following the whiskey journey that Barrell takes me on.  They aren’t concerned with consistency of flavors between batches.  Quite the opposite, in fact.  Every batch is different.  Flavor profile, age, proof… it changes with every release.

For Batch 016, straight bourbon whiskies from Tennessee, Indiana, and Kentucky were batched together, with the youngest being 9 years 9 months old.  Barrels that were 11 and 15-years-old were also used in the blend.  As always, Barrell bourbon releases are bottled at cask strength.  Here it’s 105.8 proof.

This batch is very fruit forward.  It’s quite evident on the nose, with hints of orange peel, fresh apricots, and apple jam.  A sprinkling of spice and oak add a little oomph.  Even though this is cask strength, there is no need to add water.  I find the 105.8 proof perfectly drinkable.  Taste-wise, hints of key lime pie and orange marmalade paint a picture of sweet and sour.  Toffee, oak spice, and dark roasted coffee (reminds me of Starbucks Cafe Verona blend) round things out.  The finish is warm and sticks around a while, with lingering notes of macerated berries and mineral water.

Thumbs up here.  I really like the roundness of the whiskey as much as I enjoy the big fruit notes showcased.  I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: this is another beautiful blend by Barrell founder Joe Beatrice and Head Distiller Tripp Stimson.  Keep it going, fellas.  Recommended! 8.5/10

barrellbourbon.com

Thanks to Barrell Craft Spirits for the sample, which is a production bottle.  As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

Be sure to follow Adventures In Whiskey on social media for more content.

IG_Glyph_Fill flogo_RGB_HEX-512 Twitter_Logo_WhiteOnBlue