Bourbon

Review: Barrell Bourbon Batch 021

Barrell Bourbon batch 021 comes to us as a blend of 10-14-year-old straight bourbon whiskies distilled and aged in Tennessee and Kentucky. The 10-year-old barrels used in this batch featured an oak-forward character. Eighteen 14-year-old barrels were added to bring a bit of balance to the final blend. The resulting batch comes in at 106.34 proof (53.17% abv).

The nose starts with a big butterscotch note soon accompanied by hints of English breakfast tea, spice, and ripe berries, with a tinge of lemon peel. It’s deep but lively. On the palate, dark berries mingle with vanilla and molasses. Spices build but don’t overpower. The long, dry finish features oak tannins, leather, and dried fruit.

The webpage for this batch mentions it’s a “wonderfully autumnal bourbon, built on a dry toasty backbone with hints of butter and fruit layered in for complexity and contrast.” The description is spot on. I can easily imagine sipping on this batch of Barrell Bourbon in front of a fire on a cool night. It feels like it was designed for precisely this time of year. Another appetizing release from the meticulous minds at Barrell Craft Spirits. Highly recommended.

Barrellbourbon.com

Thanks to Barrell Craft Spirits for the production sample. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

Review: Booker’s 2019-03 “Booker’s Country Ham”

A while back during a local Knob Creek tasting here in New Orleans, the local Beam Suntory team brought out one of Fred Noe’s country hams for the group to enjoy. I eat ham all the time, but this one still sticks out in my memories.

Country Ham is the name for the third batch of Booker’s bourbon in 2019. Booker Noe loved his ham. In fact, there’s a story in Jim Kokoris’s book, “The Big Man of Jim Beam,” in which Booker brought one of his smoked hams to a fine restaurant in Chicago. You know, to show them how real ham was supposed to taste!

This batch is 6 years, 4 months, and 2 days old, and has been bottled at 62.35% ABV (124.7 proof). The nose is typical Booker’s – lots of vanilla and caramel alongside hints of honey-roasted nuts and oak. At just over 124 proof, Booker’s Country Ham drinks fine neat. Taste-wise, it’s more of what you’ve come to expect: lots of vanilla, roasted sweet corn, caramel-covered cinnamon rolls, and some oak spice. The long finish wraps you in a sweet, warming Kentucky hug.

Booker’s Country Ham is another solid batch of Jim Beam’s cask strength bourbon. It’s a great one to introduce people curious about the brand as it solidly represents the Booker’s standard flavor profile. Recommended! Now, if I could just get my hands on more of that country ham…

Bookersbourbon.com

Thanks to Booker’s bourbon for the sample. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.

Review: Buffalo Trace Antique Collection (2019)

Photo courtesy of Buffalo Trace Distillery

It’s that time of year, folks. I’m referring to the release of the annual Buffalo Trace Antique Collection. As always, there’s not a lot of this stuff floating around, and even less at the suggested retail pricing of $99. In my humble opinion, this collection represents some of the finest whiskey from Buffalo Trace. This year’s bottlings were mostly as great as expected. There was one stellar standout and another that didn’t quite hit the mark.

GEORGE T. STAGG

Generally my top choice of all whiskies in the Buffalo Trace Antique Collection, George T. Stagg sees its lowest proof ever this year at 116.9 proof. This is due to a large percentage of barrels coming from lower warehouse floors, which, due to its higher humidity, causes alcohol to evaporate faster. The 15-year-old bourbon also saw a high evaporation rate of 56% percent for this year’s batch.

The nose instantly takes me back to classic Stagg with hints of demerara sugar, figs, oak spice, dark chocolate and nougat. Taste-wise, dark brown sugar kicks off a loud rock concert on the palate. Vanilla, mocha, and cinnamon have their amps cranked up to eleven. The finish features slightly burnt caramel, pepper, and toasted oak spice. Dark, loud, and brooding – it’s what George Stagg is supposed to be. Don’t let the low proof fool you. This is one not to be missed. 9.5/10

WILLIAM LARUE WELLER

One of the most popular selections among bourbon fans, William Larue Weller features Buffalo Trace’s wheated mash bill. This batch was distilled in 2007, making it 12 years old. It is also this year’s highest proof whiskey in the collection, clocking in a 128 proof.

Hints of caramel and freshly baked coffee cake register on the nose, with sweet corn and roasted coffee bean undertones. The entry is a touch hot but still approachable at 128 proof. It’s also on the sweeter side, with big caramelized sugars, vanilla, and brioche notes. A touch of earthiness and baking spices on the back palate adds a bit of complexity. The finish is long and warming. I’ve never been let down by a WLW release, and the 2019 entry continues that streak. Bold, sweet flavors… what’s not to like? 9/10

EAGLE RARE 17-YEAR-OLD

Last year, Buffalo Trace decided to raise Eagle Rare 17’s proof from 90 to 101, a nod to the bottling proof when the brand was launched in 1974. It was one of the best decisions they ever made. At 17 years old, a bourbon’s oak flavors can completely take over. Not the case here. This year’s batch was distilled in 2002 and has matured on the first floor of Warehouse P.

If Stagg is dark and brooding, Eagle Rare 17 is refined and stately. Dark toffee, dusty oak, and dark chocolate define the nose. On the palate, we’re treated with hints of dark chocolate covered orange, cocoa, vanilla extract, toffee. A drying toasted oak note lingers throughout the palate and into the long, dry finish. We’re left with subtle hints of oak spice and caramel. From memory, last year’s Eagle Rare stood out from past bottlings. The 2019 edition continues to improve the brand’s flavor profile by ever so slightly toning down the oak notes and allowing other flavors to shine through. This is a case of my wishing the sample size was a full bottle. 9/10

SAZERAC RYE 18-YEAR-OLD

The oldest whiskey in the Antique Collection, Sazerac 18-year-old rye whiskey has long been a favorite of mine. There’s something exquisite about older rye whiskies. This batch was distilled in 2001 and matured on the second floors of Warehouse K and L.

On the nose, mellow rye spice meets hints of dark brown sugar, dried basil, and toasted oak. The palate kicks off with hints of vanilla and cocoa. A development of astringent toasted oak and baking spices appear soon after. Official tasting notes mention black pepper and spearmint on the finish, and they’re spot on. This year’s batch of Sazerac 18 is nice enough, but doesn’t quite hit the complexity of past releases. 8/10

THOMAS H. HANDY SAZERAC

We go from oldest to youngest. Thomas H. Handy Sazerac rye is 6-years-old, distilled back in 2013. This batch was, as always, bottled at cask strength. In this case, that’s 125.7 proof. The flavor profile of this rye generally favors the spirit versus Sazerac 18’s strong barrel influence.

The nose is fresh, featuring hints of buttered rye toast, vanilla, and cinnamon. Rye grain is the featured player on the palate. The entry kicks off with waves of caramel and sharp rye grain. Butterscotch and black peppercorn develop mid-palate. The long finish sees lingering notes of creamy caramel and a sprinkling of oak spice. This year’s batch feels vibrant and seems to showcase rye grain over past releases. Nicely done. 8.5/10

Buffalotrace.com

Thanks to Buffalo Trace for the samples. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own.